Guest Blog by Mark Wigley- Freelance Trainer Series 

Is freelance training right for me? – Part 1 
 
You should consider your time to be one of your most valuable assets. If you don’t value your time then who will? 
 
Although you have 24 hours in every day (the same amount as everyone else) how you value those hours and use those hours can make a big difference to how much you earn. 
 
Your time can be calculated in different units; the most common being hourly, daily and annually. 
 
As a full time employee your value will often be calculated as an annual salary. Your employer will also have responsibilities for other costs and commitments including: 
Holiday pay 
Sick Pay 
Your Pension 
Any staff training that you require to do your job 
Cost of supervising and appraising your work 
The cost of running the organisation 
Paying for the Christmas do. 
 
These could be called ‘added benefits’ and as a freelance trainer these need to be considered as they won’t be covered. 
 
If you are looking at becoming a self-employed freelance trainer you will need to understand your day rate and how it will impact your overall annual income, so you at the outset you will need to do some calculations and ask yourself the following questions: 
 
1. Is being a self-employed freelance trainer viable for me given MY circumstances. 
2. Can I earn what I want to earn being a freelance trainer? 
 
By considering some of the point below you should be able to answer these questions and make an informed decision. 
 
Setting your day rate. 
 
YOU should set your day rate, not anyone else. 
 
Over many years of freelance training I have heard lots of complaining about freelance trainer day rates. 
 
Comments like: 
 
‘It’s not fair, they are only paying xxxx amount per day’ 
 
‘They are making me work for xxxx a day’ 
 
I suppose ‘something is better than nothing’ 
 
Someone else is getting paid more than me. 
 
I believe that comments and complaints like these stem from two main issues: 
 
The person in question hasn’t decided what they are worth and how much they want to earn. 
 
YOU can decide (within reason) what you can earn on a daily basis. 
 
Here is a system you could use to work out first what you need to earn each day to maintain your current lifestyle and commitments and also give you a figure on what an hour or day of your work time is worth. 
 
Let’s take John who is considering self-employment. John has his OWN set of unique circumstances and has calculated that he needs to earn £40,000 per year to maintain his current lifestyle and financial commitments. 
 
There are roughly 1950 working hours in the year (52 weeks x 37.5 hours) so by dividing 40000 by 1950 we reach an hourly rate of £20.51 per hour. For a day rate as a first aid trainer this would work out at £20.51 x 6 hours or £153.82 per day. Looks simple, right? 
 
Part 2 of this series will look at additional considerations for setting your day rate. 
 
Mark Wigley is a highly successful freelance trainer in his own right and offers support and services to freelance trainers  
 
Visit www.markwigley.online for more information. 

The magic of the Primary Survey 

The magic of the Primary Survey in First Aid. 
 
I have always been a great believer in trying to keep things simple which is why when i first learned #firstaid (a long time ago now) I was excited at the simplicity of the Primary Survey. 
 
When I teach first aid to students now I focus heavily on drilling learners in the importance of doing the Primary Survey each and every time they deal with a medical emergency and getting them to practise it multiple times in class. It is one of the most powerful things you can learn on a first aid course. 
 
When discussing with learners the same fears come up around dealing with a medical emergency. 
These are: 
1.Getting it wrong and making the patient worse. 
2.Not knowing what to do in an emergency and how they will react. 
3.Being sued (I still cant believe this one is still about!) 
4.Getting hurt. 
 
Lets look at how the correct application of the Primary Survey in first aid can address all 4 of those fears. 
When faced with an emergency situation of any kind our brain can quickly become over-whelmed with everything that is going on. 
In order for us to deal with the situation effectively we need a simple yet powerful process we can use to deal with the emergency in front of us. 
With first aid this is the Primary Survey and the magic is that you can apply it to any medical emergency and it gives you a step by step process to follow each and every time that doesn't require loads of complex thinking and decision making (more difficult when your brain has gone into panic mode). 
You just start at the beginning and move through each stage, stopping to deal with a problem, or moving on to the next stage if there are no concerns. 
 
So what does the primary survey look like? 
 
Usually something like the graphic below. 
 
The more you use it and practise it the more of a habit it will become, which means it will become more of an automatic response that you don't have to think about. 
 
The Primary Survey provides you with a structured process which can be referred to if anyone questions what actions you took. (helps with No. 3) 
It helps protect you from injury by prompting you to check for Danger (helps with No. 4) 
 
As you are required to do only one thing at a time (and not everything at once) it should help your brain calm down (stopping the chimp from screeching!) and make you more useful. 
 
The Primary Survey shows you what to look for and when to look for it with clear instructions on what to do at each of the stages; minimising the chance of you getting something wrong. It is solely aimed at prompting you to check for and either identify and treat or exclude the most life threatening conditions first (helps deal with No.1 and No.2) 
 
The Primary Survey also helps build your confidence because you know you have it available to you if you have to give first aid (helps with No.2). 
 
The Primary Survey in first aid does not demand perfection (a sure fire route to hesitation and procrastination) nor does it demand a vast wealth of knowledge and complex decision making. 
 
The Primary Survey only demands that you take one simple step at a time.. 
 
Mark Wigley 

Santa’s first aid guide to the Christmas Season! 

Christmas is upon us!  
 
The nights are getting cold and snow could well be on its way! The Christmas party season is well underway but each year over 80,000 people require hospital treatment for falls, cuts and burns during the festive period. I am sure you have lots of exciting plans and parties to attend over this festive period, but have a quick read of the tips below so ensure this Christmas is all about santa, stockings AND ‘safety’!! 
 
We all love mince pies but remember your ‘RICE’ 
 
The festive period often leads to more snow, sleet, ice and rain, which can lead to increasingly slippery floors. If you or one of your colleagues falls resulting in a sprained ankle follow the RICE procedure: 
 
R - rest 
I - ice 
C - comfortable support 
E - elevation 
 
Minor cuts and grazes are common, but can be easily treated: 
 
• Make sure the wound is clean by running it under cold water or using an alcohol free wipe. When cleaning, wipe away from the wound to help minimise infection. 
• Raise and support the injured area and apply gentle pressure to minimise the bleeding. 
• Apply a plaster or sterile dressing. 
 
Would you know how to help a choking colleague? 
 
Many people will enjoy Christmas dinner at an office party this year, but would you know what to do if one of your colleagues started choking? 
• If the casualty is breathing, encourage them to continue coughing and remove any obvious obstructions from the mouth. 
• If the casualty cannot speak or stops coughing or breathing, carry out back blows. Support their upper body with one hand and help them to lean forward. Give them up to five sharp blows between the shoulder blades with the heel of your hand. Stop if the obstruction clears. Check their mouth. 
• If the back blows fail to clear the obstruction, try abdominal thrusts. Stand behind the casualty and put both arms around the upper part of their abdomen. Make sure that they are bending forwards. Clench your fist and place it between the navel and the bottom of their breastbone. Grasp your fist firmly with your other had. Pull sharply inwards and upwards up to five times. 
• Check their mouth. If the obstruction has not yet cleared, repeat steps two and three up to three times, checking the mouth after each step. 
• If the obstruction still has not cleared, call 999/112 for emergency help. Continue until help arrives or the casualty loses consciousness. 
That’s’ all from us here at Meducate Training, we aren’t meaning to be stooges and hope everyone has an exciting Christmas but always good to ‘think safe’! 
 
Merry Christmas to you all! 

Make sure your fireworks night goes off with a bang! 

Everyone loves fireworks night, and there will be hundreds of events across the UK for us all to enjoy! Or maybe, you are feeling a little adventurous and thinking of putting on your own display at home for family and friends. 
 
Without putting a dampener on the evening as its bound to be great fun, but just a few tips and reminders to make sure it’s a night to remember for the right reasons! So here are a few fireworks first aid tips and advise just in case something does go wrong on the night!. Always be prepared! 
 
Firework First Aid: 
 
Burns or scalds tips and reminders: 
 
Run it under cold water for at least 10 minutes. You need to completely cool their skin to prevent pain, scarring or further damage 
If the burn is on a child, or if you think it’s a serious burn (for example, if it’s deep, larger than the size of their hand, or on the face, hands or feet) call 999/112 for an ambulance 
Remove any jewellery or clothing near the burn (unless they’re stuck to it) 
Don’t pop any blisters or apply ice, cream or gel – this can make it worse 
Once cooled, cover the burn with cling film or a plastic bag 
If necessary, treat them for shock, by laying them down with their legs raised and supported above the level of their heart 
 
Debris in the eye tips and reminders: 
 
• Tell them not to rub it, so they don’t make it worse 
• Pour clean water over their eye to wash out what’s in there and/or to cool the burn 
• If this doesn’t work, try to lift the debris out with a damp corner of a clean tissue 
• If this doesn’t work either, don’t touch anything that’s stuck in their eye – cover it with a clean dressing or non-fluffy material. Then take or send them straight to hospital! 
 
Smoke inhalation tips and reminders: 
 
• Move them away from the smoke so they can breathe in some fresh air 
• Help them sit down in a comfortable position and loosen any tight clothing around their neck to help them breathe normally. 
 
If they don’t recover quickly, call 999/112 for an ambulance. 
 
So all that we have left to say is have a fabulous fireworks night, on behalf of everyone here at Meducate Training! 
 

Personal safety after dark. 

Personal Safety After Dark: 
 
Poor visibility and quiet roads increase dangerous risks after dark. There are lots of things that you can do to avoid the attention of opportunists and avoid becoming a target. Whilst abroad on down your own street it never hurts to be careful so I have provided a few useful tips and things to keep in mind when out and about in the evening! 
Money and Cards: 
 
Assess where you are keeping your valuables when you’re out after dark. Choose a zipped or buckled bag (open bags are tempting for pickpockets). If you have more than one bag it can be easy to forget or drop one (or more!). 
When you’re in a foreign city or out very late, it’s a good idea to keep spare cash in a different pocket just in case of an emergency! If the worst happens and you’re relieved of your wallet, you will have enough to get home. Openly using an MP3, camera or mobile phone can make you a target; these items are the most commonly stolen, so tuck them away when you are walking after dark, the world isn’t such a bad place, but in order to keep safe it’s just important to think and be careful without taking unnecessary risks which could result in an accident. 
 
Choosing your Route: 
 
Use roads that are well-lit, avoiding dark alleyways and parks, it may sound obvious but sometimes we just don’t take a moment to think and put ourselves in danger. Before leaving the house, store taxi numbers on your mobile phone. Walk confidently and purposefully, looking around – most crimes are opportunistic, so don’t give anyone cause to target you. 
If you’re often walking at night, or you live near a busy road, it’s a good idea to buy reflective clothing. You don’t need to go as far as dressing from head to toe in bright yellow gear!!! You can buy shoes with reflective stripes, reflective wristbands, or reflective tape, which can be stuck onto your jacket or trousers. For joggers and walkers, reflective outer vests are great for making you visible to drivers and other people. Walk on the right side of the road, so that you are facing oncoming cars….Just remember the basics and you can prevent an accident! 
 
Women Travelling Alone: 
 
Without sounding sexist (even though I am a woman myself) women are particularly vulnerable to additional threats at night. Quiet streets, unlicensed taxi drivers and busy drinking venues can all pose threats. In bars or restaurants, don’t let your drink or food out of your sight. If you catch a taxi on your own, call it directly from your phone and make sure the taxi driver has your name. Don’t jump into the first taxi that pulls up – unlicensed cabs are increasingly common and pose a real threat. 
 
Safety Equipment: 
 
From personal alarms to reflective clothes and numbers on your phone book, a little forward thinking means you will be well equipped to deal with an emergency. Before you leave, check for all the essentials. However, maybe one of the best tips for staying safe at night, is to stay with a friend and try to avoid walking around alone if at all possible…. 
 
Personal Safety for men: 
 
Men can also be vulnerable, and it’s important to be aware and cautious when out alone in the evening. 
 
Fights can escalate after a few too many drinks! It’s important to start relaxed; meeting aggression with aggression tends to lead to confrontation. Talk your way out of problems and always stay calm! Respect other people’s personal space as well as your own, and avoid aggressive body language, for example raised arms, or touching someone unnecessarily. 
 
If you think your about to be attacked the main aim is to get away from the situation as quickly as possible. Walk away as quickly as possible and head somewhere public, with other people around. Keep calm and if you feel you are in real danger make sure to phone the police. Report the incident as soon as possible, even if you got away unharmed others might not be so lucky. Physical self-defence should only be a last resort, remember that it doesn’t make you weak to walk away. Keep alert when out and about, and if you see someone else in danger don’t turn a blind eye, make sure to call 999 as soon as you can. 
 
Plan your routes when out at night, avoid putting yourself in unnecessary risk. Avoid things such as isolated cash machines, and if possible take routes that are lit and public, use your instincts! 
 
If you do become the victim of a crime, don’t bury your feelings, talk about it with friends and family and call charities such as the National Victim Support Help Line (0845 3030900) and talk to a profession about it. 
 
In summary, keep your wits about you, take precautions to avoid risk where possible, and above all else don’t ignore your instincts! Feel the fear it could save your life, if something doesn’t feel right, don’t ignore it, do something about it.  
 
Care for yourself and others and don’t become the next victim! 

It will never happen to me? 

It will never happen to me? 
 
First aid training is now required by most employers….You have just started a new job and have a million things on your do to list! Can you really spare the time to waste a day or two on training your unlikely to even use? If this is your perspective then maybe you need to take a moment to think about the reality. 
 
Unfortunately, serious injuries are a common occurrence, and every year thousands of people in the UK die due to serious accidents. However, many of these could be prevented if more people were trained in first aid and basic medical care was provided prior to the arrival of the Emergency Services. The majority of us will be involved in, or witness to some sort of medical emergency during our lives, but how many of us would be able to stay calm and handle to situation correctly? 
 
So if you do find yourself in a situation with a serious casualty what would you do first? Well, the first step is always to ensure you and the casualties are not in any immediate danger, and if possible make the situation safer. The next step is to call 999 to call for assistance. 
 
But after this it’s down to you, and it could be the difference between life and death: 
 
If the casualty is breathing, but unconscious, and has no other injuries which would prevent them being moved, then you should move them into the recovery position and wait until the emergency services arrive, remember to keep close observation of their breathing whilst you wait. 
 
If the casualty is unconscious and not breathing you need to start CPR straight away, every minute counts! Meducate Training offers a number of different first aid training courses from first aid at work, to paediatric first aid, all of which cover CPR - http://www.meducatetraining.co.uk/training-courses/open-course-dates/ 
 
So what about if the casualty is bleeding? Well the main aim is to prevent further blood loss and to minimise the effects of shock. Firstly consider your own safety, and if you have them available put on some disposal gloves (maybe something to consider popping into the glove compartment of your car!!). If there is nothing embedded into the wound, then apply and maintain pressure to the wound, using some sort of dressing if you have it available. Use a clean dressing to bandage the wound firmly (It could be worthwhile to go and check that your first aid kit is fully stocked!!). 
 
Continue to apply pressure until the bleed has stopped or the emergency services arrive. 
 
These tips just cover two, of the long list of daily injuries and accidents that occur. Learning how to handle an emergency could save someone’s life, and I can’t think of anything more worthwhile than that. Knowledge dispels fear! 

Help with the Care Certificate standards 

The new care certificate was introduced as a result of the Cavendish Review which highlighted inconsistencies in preparing healthcare workers for their role in care settings across Essex, London and the UK.  
 
One of the recommendations of this report was the introduction of the Care Certificate. 
 
The Care Certificate is aimed at the non-regulated healthcare workforce and sets out 15 clear standards to adhere to in daily working life and should give confidence that care workers are given the same introductory skills,knowledge and behaviours when entering the profession. These are all geared towards providing compassionate, safe and high quality care and support. 
 
The certificate was jointly developed by Health Education England and Skills For Health 
 
The Certificate sets out 15 standards and for most of them training aids are provided free of charge and can be downloaded straight to your computer very easily and then can be delivered to staff by in-house trainers' if necessary. This training should be provided on a face to face basis. 
 
It is recognised however that some of the standards require some additional specialist knowledge so standards 10, 11, 12 and 13 have no training aids provided as it is envisaged that specialist training providers would be brought in to deliver the training. 
 
Meducate Training Ltd have a track record of delivering this type of specialist training 
 
There is also a template to complete for each worker to track their progress and get signed off for each module. 
 
For more information and advice please get in touch. 

Success as a freelance trainer - Introduction 

I have been what I consider to be a very successful freelance trainer for over 5 years and whilst doing this I have also built a successful training company whose core business is supplying freelance trainer’s to other training providers. 
 
I have always found a sense of satisfaction in taking on a new trainer and watching and helping them develop, polishing their presentation skills, expanding their portfolio of courses delivered and getting excellent feedback from students and clients. 
 
It is for that reason I have decided to share some of my ‘secrets’ of success with anyone who is starting out as a freelance trainer or indeed someone who has been in the business a while already. 
 
It is my hope that you take away something from reading this guide that will help you thrive and prosper as a freelance trainer. 
 
There will be very little in this guide relating to teaching methods; this subject is the realm of a teaching course. 
It might be suggested that the title of this guide be changed to “What they don’t teach you on a Trainers’ course” 
Most of the references, examples and scenarios used in this guide relate to first aid or health and social care training (my chosen field of training) but I am sure that the principles and suggestions in this guide can be applied to any form of freelance training. 
 
I fell into freelance training purely by chance; it had never (consciously at least) been my intention to ‘do training’ however I had dabbled over the years on and off with training as part of other roles I had undertaken and looking back I do remember that I quite enjoyed it. 
 
A friend came to me and asked me if I fancied helping him and his brother out with some training that needed doing for a London based company that they were involved in running. The question had come at just the right time; I had just left a full time employed position and was looking at starting up a self-employed sales agent and this new idea of doing training seemed much more appealing. I jumped at the chance. I am a firm believer that you should never be dogmatic in your approach to your career direction and you should be willing to change direction if an opportunity presents itself. Success is rarely a straight line; more a zig-zag! 
 
I worked for the London firm for 6 months helping them complete a training project that they had ongoing and when this came to an end I decided it was time to strike it out on my own. The first few months after that were tough as I pushed to become more visible (see part 5) to potential clients and work was a few days here and a few days there. 
During that really tough time I was approached by someone else also starting out on the same journey (starting their own training business) and it was really helpful to have someone to talk things through with when times got tough. We are still passing each other work to this day; building solid relationships (see part 6) is a key aspect of surviving in the world of business. 
 
The hard work of making myself more visible eventually paid off and I got a lucky break securing work with a major training provider who is still one of my biggest client and to whom I regularly supply over 300 training days a year to either delivered by myself or some of my associates. 
 
I eventually reached the point where I was being offered more work than I could cope with so it was time to bring in some help. I went out and recruited a couple of freelance trainers to cover the odd job that I was unable to deliver but before I knew it I was getting even more work including work directly under my own brand. A bigger pool of freelance trainers was recruited and my company Meducate Training Ltd came into being. 
 
Meducate Training Ltd now provides a mixture of its own brand of training direct to the end user as well as providing freelance trainer’s to other training providers all across the UK. Meducate Training Ltd works with a number of training provider’s both large and small and we have built a solid reputation (see part 9) for delivering high quality hassle-free training. 
 
Most of this guide will focus on what it takes to be an excellent freelance trainer from two perspectives, the trainer and the training provider. 
 
I have divided the guide up into 10 different sections relating to my ‘tips for success’ and I hope after reading them you too can put them into action and be successful. 
 
The first tip for success is all about belief and will be covered in the next article. 

2015 Resuscitation Guidelines released. 

The new Resuscitation Guidelines were released on the 15th October and are available to download. 
 
Although they do not contain anything dramatically new in terms of administering first aid they do emphasise the importance of starting CPR promptly to ensure the best chance of an improved outcome for the patient. We know that chest compressions work! 
 
Where a patient is suspected of having had a seizure, cardiac arrest should be suspected and a careful initial assessment of airway and breathing should be conducted.  
 
"Immediately following cardiac arrest blood flow to the brain is reduced to virtually zero, which may cause seizure-like episodes that may be confused with epilepsy. Bystanders and emergency medical dispatchers should be suspicious of cardiac arrest in any patient presenting with seizures and carefully assess whether the victim is breathing normally" 
 
Emphasis is also put on early access to an AED (Defibrillator) which can dramatically improve the chance of a good outcome for the patient. 
 
The guidelines also highlight the importance of the interaction between the Emergency Medical Dispatcher, the bystander giving CPR and timely deployment of an AED. An effective community response can be vital in putting all of these together. 
 
It cannot be stressed enough that early bystander CPR and defibrillation is key to improving outcomes for the 60,000 suspected cardiac arrest victims attended by UK ambulance crews every year. 
 
Quotes and figures taken from the 2015 guidelines. 

New Resuscitation guidelines due for release 15th October 2015 

The Resuscitation Council (UK) will be publishing updated guidance on the 15th October (just over a week away) relating to Resuscitation. 
 
The updated guidelines are based on the most up to date available science and have three main aims: 
 
Simplifying clinical practice 
Enhancing education 
Improving outcomes 
 
The content of the revised guidelines will not be known until they are published on the 15th October so watch this space for more information. There also links below that will take you to the Resuscitation Council (UK) website. 
 
All organisations providing clinical care or education are expected to implement these guidelines by January 2017. 
 
In the meantime what you have already been taught to do during a first aid course in relation to Resuscitation still remains the proper and correct thing to do in an emergency.  

New Nursery and Pre-School staff to be required to take Paediatric First Aid Training - 06/10/2015 

After a high profile campaign and petition by the parents of Millie Thompson who tragically died from choking whilst in the care of her nursery new legislation is due to come into force in September 2016 (subject to full consultation) making it compulsory for all new staff working in an Early Years setting must complete a suitable Paediatric First Aid Course such as the AofA Level 3 Emergency Paediatric First Aid Course or the AofA Level 3 Paediatric First Aid Course. This certificate would be renewable through re-training every 3 years. The government estimate that this may affect up to 15,000 new childcare workers next year who are entering the profession. 
 
OFSTED as part of their inspection regime may ask to see evidence from a provider that they have suitably qualified staff in Paediatric First Aid including checking the validity of the certificate. Early Years Providers are free to choose whomever they want to supply their Paediatric First Aid however OFSTED have issued guidance that says that Paediatric First Aid Training must: 
 
be provided by one of the Voluntary Aid Societies such as St Johns Ambulance or British Red Cross 
or 
Be a nationally recognised qualification provided by an Awarding Body such as Qualsafe or the AoFA delivered through a private training provider 
or 
Provided by an organisation that is a member of a recognised first aid industry trade body (such as FAIB) 
 
If a provider chooses a training organisation that does not meet one of the stipulations above then they must be able to prove that they have done sufficient due diligence in ensuring that the instructor delivering the course has the suitable teaching qualifications and certification to be able to teach first aid and that the course syllabus contains all the content that is provided by the recommended routes listed above. 
 
One other point that is useful to mention is that there is NO SUCH THING as an OFSTED APPROVED FIRST AID COURSE.  
 
OFSTED do not approve course content and they do not approve training providers either, they only make recommendations as to what training is suitable. Any training provider claiming that their courses are OFSTED approved are giving incorrect information and caution is advised in choosing them as a training provider. 
 
Although September 2016 does seem a long way off it will surely come around quickly (just as Christmas does every year!) so it is always a good plan to get organised as early as possible. 
 
If you would like any advice or help with planning or booking on-site or classroom training courses please feel free to contact us on 0207 1935407 
 

Newswire 

Welcome to our news and article section where you can keep updated on what we are up to and read some interesting (we hope) articles related to training. 
 
Feel free to join in by posting your opinions and comments in the box provided at the bottom of the page. 
 

Meducate Training Ltd employs a bid writer - 04/09/2015 

We are pleased to announce that we have now employed a full time bid writer to help grow our expanding business by tendering for large contracts in the public sector. 
 
Geoff brings a wealth of experience in bidding for and winning public sector tenders so we are excited that he will be able to contribute massively to our ambitious plans for expansion over the next few years. 
 
"Employing a professional bid writer will help us get out there and bid for larger contracts as well as maintaining our excellent service to smaller clients. We have experienced amazing growth over the last 3 years, mainly down to the professionalism of our team of trainers. I look forward to Meducate Training Ltd tendering and hopefully winning new public sector contracts in the future" - Mark Wigley, Director. 

Health and Social Care Training Package - 26/06/2015 

Meducate Training Ltd has put together a special package of courses that we are currently running for a number of clients into one product to save you time and money. 
 
These are specifically aimed at the health and social care sector and those dealing with mental health and those at risk of suicide or self-harm. 
 
1 Day Anti-Ligature Training 
 
Learn how to risk assess environments and effectively respond to those attempting suicide by hanging/strangulation. This course is very practical and allows delegates to practice removing different types of ligatures. 
 
When booked on its own this is £450 + VAT for up to 12 people. 
 
Currently delivering to secure mental health facilities, specialist schools and probation premises. 
 
1 Day Level 2 Emergency First Aid 
 
Nationally recognised qualification in workplace first aid. 
 
When booked on its own this is £450 + VAT for up to 12 people. 
 
Currently delivering to secure mental health facilities, care homes and probation premises. 
 
1 Day Lone Worker Persafe 
 
Learn essential skills to keep safer as a lone worker in any workplace. 
 
Focus is on Prevention, Vigilance and Avoidance. Practical part of the course involves learning some simple techniques to disengage from trouble quickly and using minimum force. 
 
When booked on its own this is £600 + VAT for up to 12 people. 
 
Currently delivering through a nationwide training provider. 
 
Book all 3 courses together for a combined total of £1350 + VAT. 
 
Any combination of dates, any location with England and Wales. 
 
To book please call 07791 865269 or email office@meducatetraining.co.uk Click on this text to edit it. 

New Training Centre Opening in Colchester Essex - 30/03/2015 

Meducate Training Ltd is pleased to announce the opening in April of its new bespoke training centre in Colchester Essex. 
 
This facility has a large training room; big enough to accommodate up to 24 delegates in one go as well as office and storage space for training equipment. 
 
A full diary of training courses has been scheduled for 2015 which you can take a look at by clicking here 
 
Meducate Training Ltd has been offering first aid, health and social care and personal safety courses on-site at client locations since 2009 
 
"After 5 years of providing high quality training to our customers at their location it is very exciting to be in a position to offer our range of training courses to smaller groups and also the individual person that wishes to develop their skill's and knowledge. Being able to provide the open course offering I feel is a natural progression for the company which has grown steadily since 2009. All are welcome on our courses but in particular we are keen to offer excellent rates for any business in the Peartree Road area of Colchester" - Mark Wigley MD 
 
The facility is based behind Hatfields off Peartree Road in Stanway Colchester, our postcode is CO3 0NW. 
 
If you liked this story please Like us on Facebook and/or Follow us on Twitter 

Level 3 First Aid At Work - 29/05/2015 

What is it? 
The Level 3 QCF First Aid At Work is a 3 day classroom based first aid training course designed to qualify staff to administer first aid in higher risk working environments such as agriculture and construction. 
 
Do I get a nationally recognised qualification if I pass the course? 
Yes. If you successfully complete the course you will receive a national recognised qualification at Level 3 on the QCF framework. 
 
We use the Association of First Aiders to accredit the first aid training courses we deliver. You can read more about them here 
 
What is in the course? 
You will have to wait and see! It will be an exciting mix of theory and practical work including videos, case studies and group work. There has been known to be some fake blood too! 
 
How much does it cost? 
We charge £160 + VAT per person to come to our training facility in Colchester but we can also quote for coming to your site and doing the training. We are also happy to offer discounts for groups of 7 or more. 
When is your next course? 
Our next classroom based course is on the 13th 14th and 15th July in Colchester. 
 
I am driving, is there parking? 
Yes, and it is free too! 
 
Do you provide lunch? 
Bring sandwiches! We do however provide plenty of tea and coffee and if you are very good biscuits as well. 
 
How do I book? 
Call now on 0207 1935407 or email office@meducatetraining.co.uk 
 
We look forward to seeing you on one of our first aid training courses! 

Click on this text to edit it. 

Back to top 
Our site uses cookies. For more information, see our cookie policy. ACCEPT COOKIES MANAGE SETTINGS